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Welcome to SovereignGraceSingles.com. Where Reformed Faith and Romance Come Together! We are the only Christian dating website for Christian Singles in the Reformed Faith worldwide. Our focus is to bring together Christian singles of all ages. Reformed single Christian men and women who wish to meet other Reformed Christian singles for spiritually, like-minded, loving relationships.
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Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18
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Meet Like Minded Believers Can two walk together except they be agreed? - Amos 3:3
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SovereignGraceSingles

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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SGS offers a "fenced" community: both for private single members and also a public Protestant forums open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene-derived Christian Church.
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Goth Explorer

Women in the life of the church

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Goth Explorer

Following on from a recent post elsewhere on this site, I will now address the matter of women in the church, not just in ministry,

 

A church I used to attend would not let women serve on the committee.  The reason for this was that St Paul in two of his letters made it clear that a deacons and overseers were to be men.  They did however let a woman lead the Sunday school, and they also let her be treasurer when the previous male treasurer left.  Whether or not she was allowed to attend church committee meetings as treasurer I do not know.  Maybe she was admitted as a non-voting member.

 

However it occurs to me that St Paul also said that a deacon or overseer should be the husband of but one wife.  Does that mean that a bachelor or widower cannot serve?

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Guest William
3 minutes ago, Goth Explorer said:

However it occurs to me that St Paul also said that a deacon or overseer should be the husband of but one wife.  Does that mean that a bachelor or widower cannot serve?

We must remember that Paul was an "apostle" and not a Pastor. Just putting this out there because Catholics believe in Apostolic Succession and therefore keep open the office of Apostle. Based on Paul's single status they create a criteria for such office.

 

A bachelor is not a husband, and if he is a widower and remarries he is a husband of one living wife.

 

God bless,

William

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Goth Explorer
3 minutes ago, William said:

We must remember that Paul was an "apostle" and not a Pastor. Just putting this out there because Catholics believe in Apostolic Succession and therefore keep open the office of Apostle. Based on Paul's single status they create a criteria for such office.

  

A bachelor is not a husband, and if he is a widower and remarries he is a husband of one living wife.

 

God bless,

William

I think you are saying that a bachelor or a widower may not serve as a deacon or overseer.

 

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Guest William
31 minutes ago, Goth Explorer said:

I think you are saying that a bachelor or a widower may not serve as a deacon or overseer.

 

One that has only one living wife may serve as an overseer. There's a difference between Apostle and a Pastor. Lest we believe the Apostolic office is open today and the revelatory process continues? The office of Apostle writes Scriptures whereas the office of Pastor illuminates the word of God. Deacon is another story. Bigamists and those who are unbiblically remarried are not to hold office in the church, and this is in harmony with Leviticus 21:13, 14 and Malachi 2:11-16.

 

I am divorced, and I remarried after my then wife filed for divorce and was remarried. Our marriage bed was defiled and our covenant broken. In my opinion I have two living wives regardless if one is an X in the context of 1 Timothy 3. I am not qualified to be an overseer. I failed in my first marriage, and that's evidence of my failings to care for a family, how much more to tend for an entire flock and the marriages in the flock?

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Goth Explorer

I once began reading a biography of Saint Paul, and the author was convinced that Paul was a divorcee.  If so, then he must have been a young divorcee.  He was a young man when he first appears in Acts 7, and nowhere does Acts say he had a wife.

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Guest William
15 minutes ago, Goth Explorer said:

I once began reading a biography of Saint Paul, and the author was convinced that Paul was a divorcee.  If so, then he must have been a young divorcee.  He was a young man when he first appears in Acts 7, and nowhere does Acts say he had a wife.

There's no reason to believe that Paul was not a widower let alone someone divorced. Most of these "theories" circulate around whether men to hold a position in the Sanhederin had to be married. We may infer (reason) from Scripture that if Paul held a position in the Sanhederin then he was married at one time. We are left to speculate as to whether he is a divorcee or widower. Regardless, the arguments surrounding Paul are that he disqualified himself from an Overseer or Pastor. As a Cessationist I am merely pointing out that he was an Apostle and not a Pastor.

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davidtaylorjr
2 hours ago, Goth Explorer said:

I once began reading a biography of Saint Paul, and the author was convinced that Paul was a divorcee.  If so, then he must have been a young divorcee.  He was a young man when he first appears in Acts 7, and nowhere does Acts say he had a wife.

I would love to know how in the world the author came to that conclusion...

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