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Welcome to SovereignGraceSingles.com. Where Reformed Faith and Romance Come Together! We are the only Christian dating website for Christian Singles in the Reformed Faith worldwide. Our focus is to bring together Christian singles of all ages. Reformed single Christian men and women who wish to meet other Reformed Christian singles for spiritually, like-minded, loving relationships.
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Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18
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Meet Like Minded Believers Can two walk together except they be agreed? - Amos 3:3
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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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SGS offers a "fenced" community: both for private single members and also a public Protestant forums open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene-derived Christian Church.
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Guest William

Divine Begottenness and Procession

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Guest William

“The Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you.”

- John 14:26

 

All people possess a human nature, which includes attributes such as a mind, a body, and a will. So, every human being is fully human regardless of gender, race, age, or other qualities. But even though every human being possesses a human nature, we have distinct attributes. For instance, the mind of one human being is not the same as the mind of another. The same applies for every essential human attribute. We are all fully human, but there are differences between us in terms of our human attributes. We do not share the same mind, soul, body, will, or any other human attribute.

 

The unity of the divine persons with respect to the divine nature is wholly different. The three persons of the Trinity are all divine in that to have a divine nature is to be divine; yet, the divine attributes are also identical between the three persons of the Godhead. The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit do not have three different minds; They have one identical mind. The same applies for every other divine attribute.

 

What makes the three persons of the Trinity differ from one another is a difference in relations, not in attributes. From the early church fathers through the Protestant Reformers to today, orthodox Christianity has said that what makes the Father the Father is that He is eternally unbegotten and what makes the Son the Son is that He is eternally begotten. Evidence for this is found in passages such as John 1:18, which in the KJV refers to the Son as “begotten.” This is a better translation of the Greek than in some newer English versions, for the underlying Greek word has to do with generation. The Son is eternally generated by the Father. This generation, or begottenness, never had a beginning. The Son has always existed and has always been fully God even though He is begotten of the Father. And the Father has always begotten the Son such that the Son and the Father are both fully God.

 

Unbegottenness is the unique personal property of the Father, begottenness is the unique personal property of the Son, and procession is the unique personal property of the Holy Spirit. Following such texts as John 14:26, we say that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son. This passage, Dr. R.C. Sproul explains in his commentary John, says that “the Spirit is sent by both Father and Son,” and Christian thinkers have seen this sending as reflective of a relationship of the Holy Spirit to Father and Son before time began. The Father and the Son sent the Holy Spirit at Pentecost because He has proceeded from Them from all eternity.

 

Coram Deo

Why should we care to know these things about divine unity and distinction? It is not merely to fill our heads with theological knowledge. These concepts give us a further glimpse at who God is, allowing us to be filled with awe at how much greater God is than we can imagine. Knowing His set-apartness moves us to worship Him for His greatness, and thus we fulfill the purpose for which we were made.

 

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All people possess a human nature, which includes attributes such as a mind, a body, and a will. So, every human being is fully human regardless...

 

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Faber
3 hours ago, William said:

What makes the three persons of the Trinity differ from one another is a difference in relations, not in attributes. 

Excellent point.

 

 The Spirit of the Lord in Isaiah 40:13 reads the "mind of the Lord" (νοῦν κυρίου) in the Septuagint (LXX). 

 Paul applies the mind of the Lord in reference to the Father (Romans 11:34) and in reference to the Lord Jesus (1 Corinthians 2:16).

     1. The Expositor's Greek Testament: Paul translates the νοῦν κυρίου of Isaiah into his own νοῦν χριστοῦ; to him these minds are identical (cf. Matthew 11:27, John 5:20, etc.). Such interchanges betray his “innermost conviction of the Godhead of Christ” 
http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/view.cgi?bk=1co&ch=2#1-5

 

 In terms of the Holy Spirit, if one has the mind of Christ then this means they have the Spirit of Christ.

1 Corinthians 2:16

For who hath known the mind of the Lord, that he may instruct him? But we have the mind of Christ. (KJV)

     1. BDAG (3rd Edition): Paul "is using the scriptural word nous to denote what he usu. calls pneuma (vs 14). He can do this because his nous (since he is a 'pneumatic' person) is filled w. the Spirit, so that in his case the two are interchangeable" (nous, page 680).

     2. TDNT: (2:16): To the pneuma passages we should also add 1 C. 2:16: "But we have the nous of Christ." The statement concludes a section in which the reference is consistently to pneuma, and therefore one might have expected pneuma. But Paul is influenced by the preceding quotation from Is. and therefore, equating kurios and Christ, he writes nous. As elsewhere, and as is often true of pneuma, nous here means "mind" or "disposition." There is no suggestion of the nous concept of the Gks. and of later Hermetic mysticism (2:820, echō, Hanse).

 

 I think it is immensely beautiful that each Person has one mind and yet the Bible affirms that they still fully know one another's mind.

 The Holy Spirit fully knows the mind of the Father (1 Corinthians 2:10) and the Father fully knows the mind of the Spirit (Romans 8:27).

 The Father and the Son fully know each other (Luke 10:22).

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Faber
3 hours ago, William said:

Following such texts as John 14:26, we say that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son. This passage, Dr. R.C. Sproul explains in his commentary John, says that “the Spirit is sent by both Father and Son,” and Christian thinkers have seen this sending as reflective of a relationship of the Holy Spirit to Father and Son before time began. The Father and the Son sent the Holy Spirit at Pentecost because He has proceeded from Them from all eternity.

 Both Luke (the author) and Peter (the speaker) concur.

 God the Father sent the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:17-18) and God the Son sent the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:33). Notice that this sending is attributed to "the Lord" (YHWH) of Joel 2:32 to which Luke (and Peter) apply unto the Lord Jesus (cf. Acts 2:21).

     1. Stephen Motyer: The New Testament use of this expression is remarkable for the way in which it is applied to Jesus. Joel 2:32 is quoted in both Acts 2:21 and Romans 10:13, but in both places "the Lord" is then identified as Jesus (Acts 2:36; Romans 10:14). The dramatic conviction of the first (Jewish) Christians was that Israel's worship needed to be redirected: people could no longer be saved by calling on Yahweh/Jehovah, the Old Testament name of God, but only on that of Jesus: "there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved" (Acts 4:12). To "call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ" (1 Corinthians 1:2) therefore means worshiping him with divine honors (Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology, Call, Calling).
http://www.studylight.org/dictionaries/bed/c/call-calling.html

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