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Welcome to SovereignGraceSingles.com. Where Reformed Faith and Romance Come Together! We are the only Christian dating website for Christian Singles in the Reformed Faith worldwide. Our focus is to bring together Christian singles of all ages. Reformed single Christian men and women who wish to meet other Reformed Christian singles for spiritually, like-minded, loving relationships.
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SovereignGraceSingles

Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18
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Meet Like Minded Believers Can two walk together except they be agreed? - Amos 3:3
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SovereignGraceSingles

John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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SGS offers a "fenced" community: both for private single members and also a public Protestant forums open to Bible-believing Christians such as Presbyterians, Lutherans, Reformed, Baptists, Church of Christ members, Pentecostals, Anglicans. Methodists, Charismatics, or any other conservative, Nicene-derived Christian Church.
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Solas

Genesis 6:3 and irresistible grace

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Guest William
11 minutes ago, Solas said:

Right, he just threw it out for consideration, like I did.

I think Origen posses more skill than Gill when it comes to tossing someone out:

 

midget GIF

 

In humor:

 

 

Hope many don't mind a slight derailing for humor sake!

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Guest
On 5/6/2019 at 6:12 PM, Solas said:

Right, he just threw it out for consideration, like I did.

That is fine.  I don't have any problem with that.  However like Nahmanides (i.e. Ramban) I find Rishi's comments unsatisfying.

 

Let's examine another issue in the text.  What does the phrase "his days shall be 120 years" mean?

 

(a) life spans are shortened 120 years

(b) the interval of time remaining before the Flood

 

Any thought?

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atpollard

Hey, I think I came to nearly the same conclusion as  Rashi ... [EDIT:  OK, maybe not.  Those people were all about the Flood in 120 years and nothing else.  I don’t see it that way.  For one thing, God is STILL contending with evil men THOUSANDS of years later, so the flood did not really accomplish the end of evil men.  However a 120 year life does accomplish the end to each and every individual man contending with God.]

 

God was just saying “I am only going to put up with this crap for so long, and 120 years is the limit ... then it is time to pay the piper!”

Edited by atpollard

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atpollard
41 minutes ago, Origen said:

(a) life spans are shortened 120 years

I took it to mean this one.  

It may be talking about the flood, but the bigger picture is that God did start calling people to account for their lives a lot sooner than multiple centuries after that point.

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Solas
1 hour ago, Origen said:

That is fine.  I don't have any problem with that.  However like Nahmanides (i.e. Ramban) I find Rishi's comments unsatisfying.

 

Let's examine with another issue in the text.  What does the phrase "his days shall be 120 years" mean?

 

(a) life spans are shortened 120 years

(b) the interval of time remaining before the Flood

 

Any thought?

Perhaps both, as we see both.

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Guest
5 minutes ago, Solas said:

Perhaps both, as we see both.

So a text can mean two different things at the same time?

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Guest
42 minutes ago, atpollard said:

I took it to mean this one.  

Life spans after the flood did decrease.  If it refers to a 120 year life span it took some time to get to that point.

 

Shem 600

Arphaxad 438

Salah 433

Eber 464

Peleg 239

Reu 239

Serug 230

Nahor 148

Terah 205

Abraham 175 - Sarah 127

Isaac 180

Jacob 147

 

 

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Solas
14 minutes ago, Origen said:

So a text can mean two different things at the same time?

Ever hear of double fulfillment? After all, they are not contradictory.

Edited by Solas

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Guest William

First thing that came to mind was the age of Job, and the time frame of his life. After the flood? How long did Job live?

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Guest
7 minutes ago, Solas said:

Ever hear of double fulfillment?

Yes.  What is the evidence we ought to take the phrase as a reference to both shortening of life spans and to the length of time remaining before the flood?

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Solas
5 minutes ago, Origen said:

Yes.  What is the evidence we ought to take it as a reference to both shortening of life spans and to the length of time remaining before the flood?

I just threw it out as a possibility, but if your age chart post #32 is correct I guess not, unless it's a general statement but even the averages don't pan out.

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Guest
9 minutes ago, William said:

First thing that came to mind was the age of Job, and the time frame of his life. After the flood? How long did Job live?

According to Job 42:16 "And after this Job lived 140 years, and saw his sons, and his sons’ sons, four generations."

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Guest
9 minutes ago, Solas said:

I just threw it out as a possibility, but if your age chart post #32 is correct I guess not, unless it's a general statement but even the averages don't pan out.

I understand and please don't get me wrong.  I am willing to entertain most possibilities.  Yet as I have pointed out at least some objective evidence is necessary in order to make an informed choice.  At the very least I am looking for the most probable explanation based upon the evidence.

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atpollard
11 hours ago, Origen said:

The NIV has "My Spirit will not contend with humans forever."  That conveys the thought same idea as the KJV.

 

However I how prefer the Net Bible and the ESV.

"My spirit will not remain in humankind indefinitely" (Net Bible)

"My Spirit shall not abide in man forever, for he is flesh" (ESV)

If 120 years only refers to the flood, then in what sense was this accomplished by the flood?

 

Does God no longer contend with sinful humankind?

Were people born with His spirit before the flood but not after?

 

I see far more trouble in an interpretation that has God making a pledge and having His arm come up short.

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Ben Asher

The following is "Got Questions Ministeries"  take(opinion) on the current discussion:

 

Quote

 

Is there an age limit to how long we can live?

 

Many people understand Genesis 6:3 to be a 120-year age limit on humanity, “Then the LORD said, ‘My Spirit will not contend with man forever, for he is mortal; his days will be a hundred and twenty years.’ ” However, Genesis chapter 11 records several people living past the age of 120. As a result, some interpret Genesis 6:3 to mean that, as a general rule, people will no longer live past 120 years of age. After the flood, the life spans began to shrink dramatically (compare Genesis 5 with Genesis 11) and eventually shrank to below 120 (Genesis 11:24). Since that time, very few people have lived past 120 years old. However, another interpretation, which seems to be more in keeping with the context, is that Genesis 6:3 is God’s declaration that the flood would occur 120 years from His pronouncement. Humanity’s days being ended is a reference to humanity itself being destroyed in the flood. Some dispute this interpretation due to the fact that God commanded Noah to build the ark when Noah was 500 years old in Genesis 5:32 and Noah was 600 years old when the flood came (Genesis 7:6); only giving 100 years of time, not 120 years. However, the timing of God’s pronouncement of Genesis 6:3 is not given. Further, Genesis 5:32 is not the time that God commanded Noah to build the Ark, but rather the age Noah was when he became the father of his three sons. It is perfectly plausible that God determined the flood to occur in 120 years and then waited several years before He commanded Noah to build the ark. Whatever the case, the 100 years between Genesis 5:32 and 7:6 in no way contradicts the 120 years mentioned in Genesis 6:3. Several hundred years after the flood, Moses declared, “The length of our days is seventy years—or eighty, if we have the strength; yet their span is but trouble and sorrow, for they quickly pass, and we fly away” (Psalm 90:10). Neither Genesis 6:3 nor Psalm 90:10 are God-ordained age limits for humanity. Genesis 6:3 is a prediction of the timetable for the flood. Psalm 90:10 is simply stating that as a general rule, people live 70–80 years (which is still true today).

 

1


Got Questions Ministries. Got Questions? Bible Questions Answered. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2002–2013. Print.

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CDF47
On 5/6/2019 at 6:38 PM, William said:

Neither am I, but my tactical rifle packs a grenade launcher named @Origen

 

charles bronson grenade launcher GIF by Cheezburger

 

LOL...Great gif.

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