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Bowman

Is Satan bound today?

Is Satan bound today?  

9 members have voted

  1. 1. Is Satan bound today?



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Bowman
8 minutes ago, Faber said:

 

 He possesses people in that he is still able to hold some captive  to do his will (2 Timothy 2:26).

 

 I never asserted that the Father is the Son.

 Do you not yet know how to read?

 

If the Father is NOT the Son, then the Holy Spirit (power of God) is not The Son,either...

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Faber

Applause.

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Bowman
14 hours ago, Origen said:

In order to exegesis a text one must thoroughly and objectively understand the grammar first.

 

 

 

That would explain why you have not provided yours...

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Bowman
14 hours ago, Origen said:

 

 

It really does not matter at this point.  Wallace clearly identifies διάβολος as monadic.  That is just a fact.  Moreover I cited two other advance Greek grammars both of which addressing the omission of the article and both of those reject your claim.  The evidence from expert Greek scholars is against your view.

 

 

 

Please show us Wallace's exegesis.

 

Wallace' book is one of grammar NOT of exegesis.

 

If you cannot show his, then show yours....

 

 

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Bowman
14 hours ago, Origen said:

 

 

You have lost all credibility that last statement.  That claim is false.

 

1369148816_Image5-17-19at7_06AM.jpg.75dc196682d2931e66f5c0bd4509450a.jpg

 

Partial Bibliography

 

690758258_Image5-17-19at7_12AM.jpg.d4c28f77fdfed7bbdd6c05e5908bdb3f.jpg

 

Also note that:

Since it is blatantly obvious you don't know Greek, tell us what your qualifications are so that we may compare you and Wallace.

 

 

Which one of Wallace's courses mention exegesis.......waiting....

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Guest William
13 minutes ago, Bowman said:

Which one of Wallace's courses mention exegesis.......waiting....

Am I missing something?

 

 

Exegesis.jpg

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Bowman
8 minutes ago, William said:

Am I missing something?

 

 

Exegesis.jpg

 

Very good!

 

Now...show us his exegesis on 1 Peter 5.8......

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Guest William
5 minutes ago, Bowman said:

 

Very good!

 

Now...show us his exegesis on 1 Peter 5.8......

I'm not the one using Wallace or even have any of his works in my personal library. Your question threw me because it was right in front of you and I didn't understand how you could miss it.

 

As far as 1 Peter 5:8 I offer John Calvin:

 

Be sober This explanation extends wider, that as we have war with a most fierce and most powerful enemy, we are to be strenuous in resisting him. But he uses a twofold metaphor, that they were to be sober, and that they were to exercise watchfulness. Surfeiting produces sloth and sleep; even so they who indulge in earthly cares and pleasures, think of nothing else, being under the power of spiritual lethargy.


We now perceive what the meaning of the Apostle is. We must, he says, carry on a warfare in this world; and he reminds us that we have to do with no common enemy, but one who, like a lion, runs here and there, ready to devour. He hence concludes that we ought carefully to watch. Paul stimulates us with the same argument in Eph 6:10, where he says that we have a contest not with flesh and blood, but with spiritual wickedness, etc. But we too often turn peace into sloth, and hence it comes that the enemy then circumvents and overwhelms us; for, as though placed beyond the reach of danger, we indulge ourselves according to the will of the flesh.


He compares the devil to a lion, as though he had said, that he is a savage wild beast. He says that he goes round to devour, in order to rouse us to wariness. He calls him the adversary of the godly, that they might know that they worship God and profess faith in Christ on this condition, that they are to have continual war with the devil, for he does not spare the members who fights with the head.

 

Can you make your point with Calvin?

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Bowman
1 minute ago, William said:

I'm not the one using Wallace or even have any of his works in my personal library. Your question threw me because it was right in front of you and I didn't understand how you could miss it.

 

As far as 1 Peter 5:8 I offer John Calvin:

 

Be sober This explanation extends wider, that as we have war with a most fierce and most powerful enemy, we are to be strenuous in resisting him. But he uses a twofold metaphor, that they were to be sober, and that they were to exercise watchfulness. Surfeiting produces sloth and sleep; even so they who indulge in earthly cares and pleasures, think of nothing else, being under the power of spiritual lethargy.


We now perceive what the meaning of the Apostle is. We must, he says, carry on a warfare in this world; and he reminds us that we have to do with no common enemy, but one who, like a lion, runs here and there, ready to devour. He hence concludes that we ought carefully to watch. Paul stimulates us with the same argument in Eph_6:10, where he says that we have a contest not with flesh and blood, but with spiritual wickedness, etc. But we too often turn peace into sloth, and hence it comes that the enemy then circumvents and overwhelms us; for, as though placed beyond the reach of danger, we indulge ourselves according to the will of the flesh.


He compares the devil to a lion, as though he had said, that he is a savage wild beast. He says that he goes round to devour, in order to rouse us to wariness. He calls him the adversary of the godly, that they might know that they worship God and profess faith in Christ on this condition, that they are to have continual war with the devil, for he does not spare the members who fights with the head.

 

Can you make your point with Calvin?

 

If Eph 6 is used as support of  1 Peter referencing Satan, then it is wrong, entirely...

 

The reader is informed that a spiritual battle is going on….NOT between us and The Devil (because he is presently bound), but against the deceit (plural ‘methodeia’) of The Devil. 

 

The text actually mentions an epithet for Satan, himself (The Darkness), and then lists-out the ‘powers’ of Satan that our battle is against – again, absolutely NO mention of it being with Satan, himself!

 

If this battle was against Satan, himself, then the text would have plainly said so, on a singular basis.  Instead, the plural deceit is listed out in plural fashion demonstrating the demonic forces which are roaming free.

 

This passage ends with the way it started – reiterating that we are NOT in battle with Satan, himself, but the darts (plural ‘belē’), demons, that he is launching at us.

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Guest William
3 minutes ago, Bowman said:

 

If Eph 6 is used as support of  1 Peter referencing Satan, then it is wrong, entirely...

 

The reader is informed that a spiritual battle is going on….NOT between us and The Devil (because he is presently bound), but against the deceit (plural ‘methodeia’) of The Devil. 

 

The text actually mentions an epithet for Satan, himself (The Darkness), and then lists-out the ‘powers’ of Satan that our battle is against – again, absolutely NO mention of it being with Satan, himself!

 

If this battle was against Satan, himself, then the text would have plainly said so, on a singular basis.  Instead, the plural deceit is listed out in plural fashion demonstrating the demonic forces which are roaming free.

 

This passage ends with the way it started – reiterating that we are NOT in battle with Satan, himself, but the darts (plural ‘belē’), demons, that he is launching at us.

So all these translations are wrong?

 

1 Peter 5:8:

New International Version
Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

New Living Translation
Stay alert! Watch out for your great enemy, the devil. He prowls around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

English Standard Version
Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Berean Study Bible
Be sober-minded and alert. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Berean Literal Bible
Be sober-minded; watch. Your adversary the devil prowls about as a roaring lion seeking whom to devour,

New American Standard Bible
Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

King James Bible
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Christian Standard Bible
Be sober-minded, be alert. Your adversary the devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour.

Contemporary English Version
Be on your guard and stay awake. Your enemy, the devil, is like a roaring lion, sneaking around to find someone to attack.

Good News Translation
Be alert, be on watch! Your enemy, the Devil, roams around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Be serious! Be alert! Your adversary the Devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour.

International Standard Version
Be clear-minded and alert. Your opponent, the devil, is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

NET Bible
Be sober and alert. Your enemy the devil, like a roaring lion, is on the prowl looking for someone to devour.

New Heart English Bible
Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Be alert, be reflective, because your enemy Satan roars like a lion and is walking and seeking whom he may devour.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Keep your mind clear, and be alert. Your opponent the devil is prowling around like a roaring lion as he looks for someone to devour.

New American Standard 1977
Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls about like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Be temperate and vigilant because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour,

King James 2000 Bible
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour:

American King James Version
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour:

American Standard Version
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour,

Douay-Rheims Bible
Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour.

Darby Bible Translation
Be vigilant, watch. Your adversary [the] devil as a roaring lion walks about seeking whom he may devour.

English Revised Version
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Webster's Bible Translation
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Weymouth New Testament
Curb every passion, and be on the alert. Your great accuser, the Devil, is going about like a roaring lion to see whom he can devour.

World English Bible
Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary, the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.

Young's Literal Translation
Be sober, vigilant, because your opponent the devil, as a roaring lion, doth walk about, seeking whom he may swallow up,

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Bowman
Just now, William said:

So all these translations are wrong?

 

1 Peter 5:8:

New International Version
Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.

New Living Translation
Stay alert! Watch out for your great enemy, the devil. He prowls around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

English Standard Version
Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Berean Study Bible
Be sober-minded and alert. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Berean Literal Bible
Be sober-minded; watch. Your adversary the devil prowls about as a roaring lion seeking whom to devour,

New American Standard Bible
Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

King James Bible
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Christian Standard Bible
Be sober-minded, be alert. Your adversary the devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour.

Contemporary English Version
Be on your guard and stay awake. Your enemy, the devil, is like a roaring lion, sneaking around to find someone to attack.

Good News Translation
Be alert, be on watch! Your enemy, the Devil, roams around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Be serious! Be alert! Your adversary the Devil is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for anyone he can devour.

International Standard Version
Be clear-minded and alert. Your opponent, the devil, is prowling around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour.

NET Bible
Be sober and alert. Your enemy the devil, like a roaring lion, is on the prowl looking for someone to devour.

New Heart English Bible
Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Be alert, be reflective, because your enemy Satan roars like a lion and is walking and seeking whom he may devour.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Keep your mind clear, and be alert. Your opponent the devil is prowling around like a roaring lion as he looks for someone to devour.

New American Standard 1977
Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls about like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Be temperate and vigilant because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour,

King James 2000 Bible
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour:

American King James Version
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walks about, seeking whom he may devour:

American Standard Version
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour,

Douay-Rheims Bible
Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour.

Darby Bible Translation
Be vigilant, watch. Your adversary [the] devil as a roaring lion walks about seeking whom he may devour.

English Revised Version
Be sober, be watchful: your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Webster's Bible Translation
Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Weymouth New Testament
Curb every passion, and be on the alert. Your great accuser, the Devil, is going about like a roaring lion to see whom he can devour.

World English Bible
Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary, the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.

Young's Literal Translation
Be sober, vigilant, because your opponent the devil, as a roaring lion, doth walk about, seeking whom he may swallow up,

 

Most have lower-case 'devil'....which means demons....so no issue here...

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Guest William
11 minutes ago, Bowman said:

 

Most have lower-case 'devil'....which means demons....so no issue here...

Quite frankly I find that theologically speaking Jesus does blind people, the Scriptures say so elsewhere in support.

 

I don't know Greek so I can't make your case from the Greek.

 

I'm outta the debate because of my lack of knowledge concerning the Greek but I just want to say that I find this argument fascinating.

 

I hope everyone involved stays civil.

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Bowman
1 minute ago, William said:

Quite frankly I find that theologically speaking Jesus does blind people, the Scriptures say so.

 

I don't know Greek so I can't make your case from the Greek.

 

I'm outta the debate because of my lack of knowledge concerning the Greek but I just want to say that I find this argument fascinating.

 

I hope everyone involved stays civil.

 

indeed, we can agree....Jesus, as God, has always blinded whom He will.

 

Peeps may not want to hear this, but it is scriptural truth.

 

Most, however, reject this truth, and then apply it to Satan - essentially raising him to deity status, albeit inadvertently...

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Guest
On 5/17/2019 at 9:31 PM, Bowman said:

Please show us Wallace's exegesis.

 

Wallace' book is one of grammar NOT of exegesis.

 

If you cannot show his, then show yours....

As I said before one must understand the grammar first.  You claimed it is not the Devil\Satan but devil.  According to three advance Greek grammars and the lexicons I cited it is the Devil, not a devil.


Since it is necessary for your view that διάβολος refer to a devil rather than the Devil, and given the fact that the grammar of the verse in no way supports your claim, your interpretation of the verse completely fails on those grounds alone.


It does not matter what I think it is.  You must support your view and the evidence is wholly against you.

 

On 5/17/2019 at 9:37 PM, Bowman said:

Which one of Wallace's courses mention exegesis.......waiting....

😂😂😂  Thank you @William.

 

The fact you do not understand what being a New Testament Greek scholar means to/for exegesis is disturbing.

 

On 5/17/2019 at 10:00 PM, Bowman said:

Now...show us his exegesis on 1 Peter 5.8......

Off hand I don't know of one but three things are sure.

 

First, even if we don't have one that is no way supports your claim.   Beside the issue is grammar (i.e. what the grammar of the verse will allow and support and what it won't).  According to the evidence cited from scholarly sources, your interpretation of the verse does not work.

 

Second, he knows Greek and you don't so whatever his view it will start with grammatical exegesis.  By the way the title of his grammar is Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture.


Third, since Wallace clearly identifies διάβολος as a reference to the Devil, logically his exegesis of the verse will not align with yours.

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Guest theophilus
19 hours ago, William said:

If not and the Elect [from all tribes, tongues, and nations] are drawn to Christ then Satan is bound in a most definite sense concerning the Elect. He is powerless and is like a strong man bound which Christ Jesus is plundering His goods.

Satan is bound today regarding his ability to influence the elect but in the future he will be bound and thrown into the bottomless pit sol he can no longer deceive the nations.  This binding is still in the future.

 

19 hours ago, William said:

The theological implication I reject is that Satan is always responsible for man's inability to save people by preaching of the Gospel [God's works].

Premillenialists agree with that belief and Satan's binding during the Millennium will prove that Satan isn't responsible.  Today we face three enemies, the world, the flesh, and the devil.  Those born during the Millennium will encounter no opposition from the world and the devil.  They will have only the flesh to contend with.  No doubt many who remain unconverted will conform outwardly to a lifestyle of righteousness because there will be no temptation to do otherwise.  When Satan is released at the end of a thousand years they will face temptations to sin for the first time.  Their yielding to temptation will reveal the true state of their souls.  The Millennium will provide the ultimate proof that we are responsible for our sins and can't blame them on some outside influence.

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atpollard
11 hours ago, Bowman said:

Please show us just ONE scriptural example of Satan possessing anyone AFTER the Cross.

Just for my own curiosity, could you point out scriptural examples of Satan possessing someone BEFORE the Cross?

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Guest theophilus
13 minutes ago, atpollard said:

Just for my own curiosity, could you point out scriptural examples of Satan possessing someone BEFORE the Cross?

There is one.

 

Then Satan entered into Judas called Iscariot, who was of the number of the twelve. He went away and conferred with the chief priests and officers how he might betray him to them.

Luke 22:3.4 ESV

 

As far as I know that is the only time the Bible says anything about Satan himself possessing anyone.

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Bowman
46 minutes ago, atpollard said:

Just for my own curiosity, could you point out scriptural examples of Satan possessing someone BEFORE the Cross?

 

Sure...

 

Luke 22

John 13

Job

 

etc, etc...

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Bowman
2 hours ago, Origen said:

As I said before one must understand the grammar first.  You claimed it is not the Devil\Satan but devil.  According to three advance Greek grammars and the lexicons I cited it is the Devil, not a devil.

 

 

Firstly, 9 out of 10 renderings use lower-case 'devil'.

 

Secondly, proper exegesis requires not only grammars, but lexicography, and concording of the term(s) in question...

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Guest
5 minutes ago, Bowman said:

Firstly, 9 out of 10 renderings use lower-case 'devil'.

I am refuting that point as we speak.

 

5 minutes ago, Bowman said:

Secondly, proper exegesis requires not only grammars, but lexicography, and concording of the term(s) in question...

The fact you have cited NONE is very telling.

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Bowman
2 hours ago, Origen said:

 

 

The fact you do not understand what being a New Testament Greek scholar means to/for exegesis is disturbing.

 

Off hand I don't know of one but three things are sure.

 

First, even if we don't have one that is no way supports your claim.   Beside the issue is grammar (i.e. what the grammar of the verse will allow and support and what it won't.  According to the evidence cited from scholarly sources, your interpretation of the verse does not work.

 

Second, he knows Greek and you don't so whatever his view it will start with grammatical exegesis.  By the way the title of his grammar is Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament with Scripture.


Third, since Wallace clearly identifies διάβολος as a reference to the Devil, logically his exegesis of the verse will not align with yours.

 

Fact:  Wallace mentions 1 Peter 5.8, in his grammar book, one time, on page 249.

 

Fact:  Wallace mentions 1 Peter 5.8, by name and number, only.

 

Fact:  Wallace declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is monadic, only.

 

Fact:  Wallace NEVER even declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is 'The Devil', to begin with.

 

Thus....you are performing your own unsubstantiated eisegesis upon the text.

 

That is why I have requested either Wallace's exegesis, or yours....

 

Simple enough...:)

 

 

 

 

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Guest
On 5/18/2019 at 9:44 AM, Bowman said:

Fact:  Wallace mentions 1 Peter 5.8, in his grammar book, one time, on page 249.

 

Fact:  Wallace mentions 1 Peter 5.8, by name and number, only.

 

Fact:  Wallace declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is monadic, only.

 

Fact:  Wallace NEVER even declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is 'The Devil', to begin with.

Thus....you are performing your own unsubstantiated eisegesis upon the text.

 

That is why I have requested either Wallace's exegesis, or yours....

 

Simple enough...:)

Fact: Wallace is a Greek scholar and you are not.

 

Fact: His expertise on the subject carry infinitely more weight than you.

 

Fact: Your claim "Wallace NEVER even declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is 'The Devil', to begin with" is misleading to say the least.  Monadic means ONE.  Wallace makes this quite clear when he states:

Quote

A curious phenomenon has occurred in the English Bible with reference to one particular monadic noun, διάβολος. The KJV translates both διάβολος and δαιμόνιον as “devil.” Thus in the AV translators’ minds, “devil” was not a monadic noun. Modern translations have correctly rendered δαιμόνιον as “demon” and have, for the most part, recognized that διάβολος is monadic (cf., e.g., 1 Pet 5:8; Rev 20:2).84 But in John 6:70 modern translations have fallen into the error of the King James translators. The KJV has “one of you is a devil.” So does the RSV, NRSV, ASV, NIV, NKJV, and JB.  Yet there is only one devil. (p. 249)

 

Fact: I cited two other advance Greek grammars which do not support your claim and which you could not address.

 

Fact: I cited six scholarly lexicons which do not support your claim and you could not address those.

 

Fact: You have cite no Greek grammars or lexicons to support your claim.

 

Fact: All the scholarly evidence cited does not support your erroneous interpretation.

 

On 5/18/2019 at 9:44 AM, Bowman said:

Simple enough...:)

😂  It is easy when you ignores all the evidence against you as you have.

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Guest
16 hours ago, Bowman said:

Most have lower-case 'devil'....which means demons....so no issue here...

That is simply not the reason for the lower-case.  For example Rev. 12:9:

 

New International Version
The great dragon was hurled down--that ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, who leads the whole world astray. He was hurled to the earth, and his angels with him.

New Living Translation
This great dragon—the ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, the one deceiving the whole world—was thrown down to the earth with all his angels. 

English Standard Version
And the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

New American Standard Bible 
And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

Christian Standard Bible
So the great dragon was thrown out--the ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the one who deceives the whole world. He was thrown to earth, and his angels with him.

 

NET Bible

So that huge dragon—the ancient serpent, the one called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world—was thrown down to the earth, and his angels along with him.

There are several points to note here.

 

Lexham English Bible

And the great dragon was thrown down, the ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world. He was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

First, even though there can be no doubt the devil here is Satan the translators do not use the upper-case.

 

Second, just like 1 Pet. 5:8 διάβολος is anarthrous and it is in apposition.

 

The reason has to do with the word itself.  The word  διάβολος is an adjective.  However as every lexicon I know of makes clear it used as a substantive.  This means the word functions as a noun even thought is an adjective.  It is to be understood as a title or name.  Since it is adjective translators will often use the lower-case even when it is beyond doubt (like Rev. 12:9) it is "the Devil Satan."

 

The evidence from scholarly lexicons is overwhelming.

Quote

in our lit. as title of the principal transcendent evil being the adversary/devil, already current in the LXX as transl. of הַשָּׂטָן

A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature 3rd Ed. p. 226

 

Quote

As concerns the alternation between σατανᾶς [i.e. Satan] and διάβολος [i.e. Devil] in the NT, no material distinction may be asserted.

Theological Dictionary of the New Testament Volume 2, p. 79

 

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In the Bible and in ecclesiastical writings ho diabolos (also diabolos without the article; cf. Winer’s Grammar, 124 (118); Buttmann, 89 (78)) is applied katʾ exochēn to the one called in Hebrew has′āṭān, ho satanas (which see), viz., Satan, the prince of demons, the author of evil, persecuting good men...

Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament p. 135

 

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διάβολος, ου m (a title for the Devil, literally ‘slanderer’); Σατανᾶς, ᾶ m (a borrowing from Aramaic; a title for the Devil, literally ‘adversary’): the principal supernatural evil being — ‘Devil, Satan.’

Greek–English Lexicon of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains 2nd Ed., Vol. 1, p. 145

 

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In contrast, διάβολος is used 37x, incl. 14x in the Gospels (but not in Mark) and 5x in Revelation; among the letters ascribed to Paul, it occurs only in Ephesians and the Pastorals. The adjectival sense “slanderous” occurs in three passages, where it is applied to human beings (1 Tim 3:11; 2 Tim 3:2; Titus 2:3).  Elsewhere it is always a subst. applied to Satan (indirectly in John 6:70, where Judas is called “a devil”; cf. 13:2); thus it functions as a title or even a proper name (see esp. Rev 12:9; 20:2).
New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology and Exegesis Vol. 1, 691

These Greek lexicons could not be more clear and in no way support your claim.

 

There are many other errors in your comment I may address latter if I have the time.

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Bowman
2 minutes ago, Origen said:

That is simply not the reason for the lower case.  For example Rev. 12:9:

 

New International Version
The great dragon was hurled down--that ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, who leads the whole world astray. He was hurled to the earth, and his angels with him.

New Living Translation
This great dragon—the ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, the one deceiving the whole world—was thrown down to the earth with all his angels. 

English Standard Version
And the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

New American Standard Bible 
And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

Christian Standard Bible
So the great dragon was thrown out--the ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the one who deceives the whole world. He was thrown to earth, and his angels with him.

 

NET Bible

So that huge dragon—the ancient serpent, the one called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world—was thrown down to the earth, and his angels along with him.

There are several points to note here.

 

Lexham English Bible

And the great dragon was thrown down, the ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world. He was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.

 

First, even though there can be no doubt the devil here is Satan the translators do not use the upper-case.

 

Second, just like 1 Pet. 5:8 διάβολος is anarthrous and it is in apposition.

 

The reason has to do with the word itself.  The word  διάβολος is an adjective.  However as every lexicon I know of makes clear it used as a substantive.  In this case it means word functions as a noun even thought is an adjective.  It is to be understood as a title or name.  Since it is adjective translators will often use the lower-case even when it is beyond doubt (like Rev. 12:9) it is "the Devil Satan."

 

The evidence from scholarly lexicons is overwhelming.

 

 

 

 

 

The Greek lexicons could not be more clear and in no way support your claim.

 

'Names and titles' are capitalized.

 

But....why do not these renderings capitalize 'Devil'...?

17 minutes ago, Origen said:

 

Fact: Your claim "Wallace NEVER even declares that 1 Peter 5.8 is 'The Devil', to begin with" is misleading to say the least.  Monadic means ONE.  Wallace makes this quite clear when it states:

 

 

The only thing 'misleading' was your assertion that Wallace declares 1 Peter 5.8 to refer to 'The Devil', of which, he clearly does not.

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1 minute ago, Bowman said:

'Names and titles' are capitalized.

 

But....why do not these renderings capitalize 'Devil'...?

I explained why.  Either you did not read it or you are able to comprehend the point.

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