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Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” - Genesis 2:18
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John Calvin puts forward a very simple reason why love is the greatest gift: “Because faith and hope are our own: love is diffused among others.” In other words, faith and hope benefit the possessor, but love always benefits another. In John 13:34–35 Jesus says, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love always requires an “other” as an object; love cannot remain within itself, and that is part of what makes love the greatest gift.
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Curly Q

Where is a car mentioned in the Bible? (see post for answer)

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Curly Q

1. 
Baptist; never been married; teaching/business administration/interpreter; trying to be more kind, agreeable, and generous because that is what I seek in a future husband (not perfect, just trying to do better); my friends say I'm smart, outgoing, sensitive, and I love to laugh (especially geek humor and dad jokes)
2. 
I got saved at 4 and again at 8 when I was certain that I had reached the age of accountability. I truly believe that the first one was real. My mom was very careful to avoid giving me a false assurance, but the Lord really worked in my brain to help me do this at that time. (ask about it)
3. 
I grew so much spiritually during, My time at Word of Life Bible Institute; Calvary Chapel Ft. Lauderdale; Urbana Youth Missions Conference; Word of Life International Youth Missions Conference
It was strange that I grew in knowledge of God's word, theology, hermeneutics, etc.; but didn't grow spiritually at Baptist Bible College. Now I'm learning to trust Him to put me in His choice for a ma
4. 
I have a love of God's Word, the Holy Spirit's pull to obey God, a desire to witness to others, unwavering certainty that He is/will lead(ing) me
5. 
A surrender to His will and work in my life (I'm so imperfect at that), a desire to serve Him by serving his people, a desire to live a life pleasing to Him, a desire to increase His kingdom by evangelism

 

Answer:

Acts 2:1 - they were all with one ACCORD

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Lee_v.2

LOLOLOLOL!!!!!! 😂🤣😂🤣  Oh... my,,, word!!!!  That is about the funniest thing ever... !!!!!  And what made it so perfect, is the serious stuff before, which is, itself, perfect! 🙂  (However, my translation says, "They were all IN one Accord.")

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davidstarcher

I'm always leery of the question when were you saved as it strikes me as belonging to the ticket punched idea of salvation. Yeah I was coached by my mother at 6 years old to repeat a prayer and of course I wanted to please her so I said it but without faith and repentance words are simply meaningless. When I finally did put my faith in Jesus I was about 12 and nobody was coaching me or encouraging me to do so; It was quite literally me and my Bible alone in the woods crying out my heart to God. I had simply concluded that I was hopelessly in sin and that all efforts to improve were futile as my problem was inherent to my nature and so I put my trust in Jesus alone to save me from my sin and my sin nature. It is that time which I point to because it is from that point that there was a marked change in my attitude and actions regarding sin(aka repentance); doing God's will was no longer a chore but a joy and it always grieved me when I failed to do so. I never told my parents about that until many years later when they told me there was a time that my behavior was so terrible they were at their wits end and seriously considering trying to get me professional help but didn't because my behavior suddenly and unexpectedly changed. Some would argue that I couldn't have been saved at that time because I didn't have a full or complete understanding of the nature of God or the gospel message, the church I was raised in lacked correct doctrine's on the trinity among other things. I however think there is a big difference between not having a correct understanding and rejecting correct understanding and once I did hear the truth while in college  I eagerly embraced it and rejected the falsehoods I had been taught in my youth. Increase in understanding is part of growing in the Christian life and nobody begins with perfect understanding.

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Lee_v.2

I have met a few people who say they don't remember a day when they didn't love Jesus.  I confess their lives and faith seem to prove their assertion.  And though their exposure to Jesus and the Bible might not have been much more than regular worship with their family, a 1st grade Sunday school class, and simple bedtime prayers, there is nothing to stop the Holy Spirit from using the simple, naive exposure to Truth in those activities to renew the heart and give the child a faith that clings to Christ.  (I am intentionally leaving out the need for such a child to still make a valid profession of faith and become a communicant member of the church when they are older... somewhere around 10-12 seems to be a good age.  The profession of faith guards against presumption and traditionalism, and it is an act of worship to make vows to God.)

 

I think we all might concede that bad teaching or theology, though it is to be avoided and corrected whenever possible, cannot fully obscure Truth if there is some kind of inclusion of the Word of God even in less theologically faithful churches and homes.  Often, I believe, it is peaceful and generous, fair-minded and moral parents who set a tone that seems to bode well for the child considering Jesus.

 

All that aside, I think a boy and a Bible and the Holy Spirit pointing to Jesus in the Scriptures are an amazingly potent mix! 🙂 

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Curly Q
On 2/1/2020 at 3:59 AM, Lee_v.2 said:

I have met a few people who say they don't remember a day when they didn't love Jesus.  I confess their lives and faith seem to prove their assertion.  And though their exposure to Jesus and the Bible might not have been much more than regular worship with their family, a 1st grade Sunday school class, and simple bedtime prayers, there is nothing to stop the Holy Spirit from using the simple, naive exposure to Truth in those activities to renew the heart and give the child a faith that clings to Christ.  (I am intentionally leaving out the need for such a child to still make a valid profession of faith and become a communicant member of the church when they are older... somewhere around 10-12 seems to be a good age.  The profession of faith guards against presumption and traditionalism, and it is an act of worship to make vows to God.)

 

I think we all might concede that bad teaching or theology, though it is to be avoided and corrected whenever possible, cannot fully obscure Truth if there is some kind of inclusion of the Word of God even in less theologically faithful churches and homes.  Often, I believe, it is peaceful and generous, fair-minded and moral parents who set a tone that seems to bode well for the child considering Jesus.

 

All that aside, I think a boy and a Bible and the Holy Spirit pointing to Jesus in the Scriptures are an amazingly potent mix! 🙂 

 

I'M SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO SORRY IT TAKES SO MANY WORDS FOR ME TO SHARE MY THOUGHTS!!!!!!!!!

 

Accepting Christ the way you did, is a good indication that God, your church, and your parents gave you a good foundation to start. Yay!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

 

Thanks for giving me the opportunity to share more. God works differently in everyone. Although, I believe it has to be a specific time and place because of scriptures like Romans 10:9-10

 

I was very lucky to have parents who were "Bereans"; and who did daily devotions and prayer. My bed time stories were what would now be called children's devotions, where my parents would read to me from a children's book of Bible stories and lead me in CONVERSATIONAL prayer. It was like they were discipling me.

 

Salvation - My mom actually avoided sharing the plan of salvation with me at such a young age (4-5) to prevent my giving a false profession of faith. I encourage all the parents out there to consult the Child Evangelism Fellowship information about that. I vividly remember asking mom why people were going forward during the altar call and her saying something like, "Ask me later." She later told me that she didn't think I was ready, but she didn't want to discourage me completely and that she also said something like, "We don't want to hinder the work of the Holy Spirit by talking now." Anyhoo, I vividly remember that I forgot all about it till the next Sunday and got the same answer from my mom. The repeated Sunday altar calls kept on reminding me. I vividly remember that finally I did something that I had never done before or since. I squeezed my little kid eyes and balled up my little kid hands and concentrated on sticking the thought in my brain to remember to ask my mom later during the week, because I was never gonna get an answer if I didn't. LOL Later that week I remember thinking about it. I think I might have considered asking later, but worrying that I would forget again. So I decided to find my mom and ask her. I don't remember the exact location, but mom says it was in the kitchen. I don't remember much detail except the gist of the conversation being what I understand now as substitutionary atonement and the choice to ask Jesus into my heart, I understood it all well enough to witness to my friends.

 

Burden for the Lost - I understood the plan of salvation and the message of my Good News Club enough, that in kindergarten I was sent to the principles office in my public school for sharing the plan of salvation with other kids and for trying to lead them to accept Christ. LOL My parents just encouraged me that I hadn't done anything wrong and that there were lots of places to witness other than school. I remember the place and the circumstances when the little girl next door told me that either she didn't believe in hell or she didn't believe in Jesus; and I told her to ask her mommy so her mommy would set her straight. LOL My parents just told me that the next door neighbor's mom didn't want me to witness to her daughter and she wouldn't let me play with her if I didn't stop. When I refused to stop witnessing to my next door neighbor, her mom wouldn't let me play with her any more and the little girl threw rocks at our front door. At the time my parents hid from me the fact about her throwing rocks at our door.

 

Baptism/Obedience to God - I was very frustrated at that age when my pastor wouldn't baptize me...

 

Waiting for the Age of Accountability...

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Curly Q
On 2/1/2020 at 3:59 AM, Lee_v.2 said:

I have met a few people who say they don't remember a day when they didn't love Jesus.  I confess their lives and faith seem to prove their assertion.  And though their exposure to Jesus and the Bible might not have been much more than regular worship with their family, a 1st grade Sunday school class, and simple bedtime prayers, there is nothing to stop the Holy Spirit from using the simple, naive exposure to Truth in those activities to renew the heart and give the child a faith that clings to Christ.  (I am intentionally leaving out the need for such a child to still make a valid profession of faith and become a communicant member of the church when they are older... somewhere around 10-12 seems to be a good age.  The profession of faith guards against presumption and traditionalism, and it is an act of worship to make vows to God.)

 

I think we all might concede that bad teaching or theology, though it is to be avoided and corrected whenever possible, cannot fully obscure Truth if there is some kind of inclusion of the Word of God even in less theologically faithful churches and homes.  Often, I believe, it is peaceful and generous, fair-minded and moral parents who set a tone that seems to bode well for the child considering Jesus.

 

All that aside, I think a boy and a Bible and the Holy Spirit pointing to Jesus in the Scriptures are an amazingly potent mix! 🙂 

So true. I understand that you are acknowledging how the Lord works in the hearts of children, and also Rm. 10:9-10

 

Each one of us reaches the age of accountability at different times and false assurance is wise concern. I like how Child Evangelism Fellowship handles it in their children's services. I grew up hearing about the age of accountability so at age 8 I sought out my teacher to pray the prayer of salvation again to accept Christ as my Savior. By the time I heard about the Christian traditions that pointed to an approximate age of 12, the Holy Spirit did not speak to me about a need for another profession/decision. 

 

I have a theory about how the wisdom of man has caught up to the wisdom of the Lord as taught in Mt. 18:2-3. What has man learned that is like this ancient truth? Have you thought about this? I'd like to hear your thoughts first before I share mine.

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Curly Q
On 1/31/2020 at 1:23 AM, Lee_v.2 said:

LOLOLOLOL!!!!!! 😂🤣😂🤣  Oh... my,,, word!!!!  That is about the funniest thing ever... !!!!!  And what made it so perfect, is the serious stuff before, which is, itself, perfect! 🙂  (However, my translation says, "They were all IN one Accord.")

 That's even better!!! ROFLMFO

 

(btw - rolling on floor laughing my FACE off)

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Lee_v.2

Well, let's see....  So, in Chapter 18, verses 2-3, of Matthew, a very Jewish gospel that speaks of the Kingdom, Jesus tenderly focuses on a child Jesus "calls to Himself."  And, the child stands there... how?  I would suggest the posture and demeanor of the child are very much in view (no wordplay intended... but, it does kinda work!).  While not sinless, there is a trusting interest the child likely has in being a subject of Jesus' love and being an object of a lesson.  The "look at me!" impulse perhaps gets swallowed up in the "look who is looking at me!" event.

 

Interestingly, from other passages in the gospels, we can assume this may be out-of-the-ordinary that a teacher or rabbi would stoop to include a child in his teaching session.  I think Jesus really loves the children and would explicitly chastise those who think children are not fit for inclusion.  But, he likely refrains - for the sake of the child and our learning from his patience with sinners who don't understand the kingdom - from being stern with the hardhearted in the crowd gathered there.

 

The verse is rendered differently depending on what Bible is read, but it seems most Bibles try to capture the literal sense, which is that Jesus' words "are converted" (lit "are turned") indicate regeneration (a fitting nod to the situation and a teaching of his the hearers would very likely have heard before) and the attendant conversion undertaken and accomplished by an independent actor or agent, the Holy Spirit (again, something Jesus already taught and expected people to know and/or be taught... think of Nicodemus).  It would likely not be in view that Jesus is referring to a mere change in attitude or perspective, though that is not absent, ultimately.  Next, the "and become" begins to speak to the actions and participation of the individual, not in regeneration, but in sanctification; specifically, in turning away from sin and diligently heading in the opposite direction, toward righteousness in thought, word, and deed.  I don't think Jesus is trying to go beyond that simple re-orientation, the creation of a new impulse, a new but nonetheless vital ethic which guides the believer.  The crowd is like the child, and needs to be taught simply, as if getting milk even though they should be mature enough to be eating meat.  Still, it stands as one of Christ's most powerful, incisive, and loving teachings which His lambs throughout history have clung to in hope and joy!

 

Finally, Jesus essentially says that without the first component, regeneration, one cannot believe and have a new impulse that desires God.  As well, true faith and the new impulse are not really there if there is no a participatory movement away from sin, the world, and the devil.  That is, if you are born again and yet you take no interest in and exert yourself not at all in living a life that seeks to live out a love to Christ and a love to man, then that rebirth is not there.  On the flip side, we are being taught that self-righteousness and striving toward conformity to standards of holiness without relying on and trusting the Lord with not just the big picture of our life, but in every detail - especially in preserving us in faith and love and trust in Him! - then we are lost and have no way into the Kingdom.  In short, that movement has a particular shape and substance for it is founded on a faith that trusts wholeheartedly just like that child did when Jesus put him in the middle of a situation for which he was unprepared.  That is the story of our sojourning, if you think about it.  We were a part of the world, but then Jesus saved us and essentially made us strangers and exiles.  Yet, because we are in his midst, He will take care of us.  The new birth and the new impulse, strengthened by the Holy Spirit and guaranteed by the Father's plan, are what keep us at Jesus' protective side so that we will always, even now, see Him - The Christ, who is himself the Kingdom.

 

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Curly Q
10 hours ago, Lee_v.2 said:

Well, let's see....  So, in Chapter 18, verses 2-3, of Matthew, a very Jewish gospel that speaks of the Kingdom, Jesus tenderly focuses on a child Jesus "calls to Himself."  And, the child stands there... how?  I would suggest the posture and demeanor of the child are very much in view (no wordplay intended... but, it does kinda work!).  While not sinless, there is a trusting interest the child likely has in being a subject of Jesus' love and being an object of a lesson.  The "look at me!" impulse perhaps gets swallowed up in the "look who is looking at me!" event.

 

Interestingly, from other passages in the gospels, we can assume this may be out-of-the-ordinary that a teacher or rabbi would stoop to include a child in his teaching session.  I think Jesus really loves the children and would explicitly chastise those who think children are not fit for inclusion.  But, he likely refrains - for the sake of the child and our learning from his patience with sinners who don't understand the kingdom - from being stern with the hardhearted in the crowd gathered there.

 

The verse is rendered differently depending on what Bible is read, but it seems most Bibles try to capture the literal sense, which is that Jesus' words "are converted" (lit "are turned") indicate regeneration (a fitting nod to the situation and a teaching of his the hearers would very likely have heard before) and the attendant conversion undertaken and accomplished by an independent actor or agent, the Holy Spirit (again, something Jesus already taught and expected people to know and/or be taught... think of Nicodemus).  It would likely not be in view that Jesus is referring to a mere change in attitude or perspective, though that is not absent, ultimately.  Next, the "and become" begins to speak to the actions and participation of the individual, not in regeneration, but in sanctification; specifically, in turning away from sin and diligently heading in the opposite direction, toward righteousness in thought, word, and deed.  I don't think Jesus is trying to go beyond that simple re-orientation, the creation of a new impulse, a new but nonetheless vital ethic which guides the believer.  The crowd is like the child, and needs to be taught simply, as if getting milk even though they should be mature enough to be eating meat.  Still, it stands as one of Christ's most powerful, incisive, and loving teachings which His lambs throughout history have clung to in hope and joy!

 

Finally, Jesus essentially says that without the first component, regeneration, one cannot believe and have a new impulse that desires God.  As well, true faith and the new impulse are not really there if there is no a participatory movement away from sin, the world, and the devil.  That is, if you are born again and yet you take no interest in and exert yourself not at all in living a life that seeks to live out a love to Christ and a love to man, then that rebirth is not there.  On the flip side, we are being taught that self-righteousness and striving toward conformity to standards of holiness without relying on and trusting the Lord with not just the big picture of our life, but in every detail - especially in preserving us in faith and love and trust in Him! - then we are lost and have no way into the Kingdom.  In short, that movement has a particular shape and substance for it is founded on a faith that trusts wholeheartedly just like that child did when Jesus put him in the middle of a situation for which he was unprepared.  That is the story of our sojourning, if you think about it.  We were a part of the world, but then Jesus saved us and essentially made us strangers and exiles.  Yet, because we are in his midst, He will take care of us.  The new birth and the new impulse, strengthened by the Holy Spirit and guaranteed by the Father's plan, are what keep us at Jesus' protective side so that we will always, even now, see Him - The Christ, who is himself the Kingdom.

 

 

Great answer!

 

I really like how you deconstructed the verse and elaborated on various phrases using various texts, while still keeping true to the context. You should check out online bibles with strong's numbers. You seam to have the right skill set to use hermetical techniques well with that kind of tool. Did you check out this link (seen below) posted in another discussion it's awesome. 

 

My thoughts about Mt. 18:2-3 were more of an observation about how children are already surrendering their will to their parents. Also, kids don't have a whole lot of things to give up to follow Christ. It doesn't require a lot of lifestyle changes on the part of children. So submitting to the Lordship of Christ is not as difficult a transition for them as it is for teenagers and adults. But, It must be hard to give up total freedom and limiting your available choices. It must be difficult to change a lifestyle that has become comfortable. Coming as a little child has a wisdom about accepting God's Lordship and complete surrender to him. Man's wisdom supports this with statistics about what ages people are when they accept Christ as their Savior. Man's wisdom is usually late to the party, but in the end God's Word will always be revealed to be unfailing. Jesus knew it, and it was written in His Word before we discovered the statistics.

 

 

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